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  #1  
Old 08-25-2023, 07:10 AM
Sparty Sparty is offline
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Default Lithium brine extraction Vs spodumene mining

Both lithium brine extraction and spodumene mining are reliable methods of extracting lithium. However, they have different advantages and disadvantages.

Lithium brine extraction is the most common method of extracting lithium. It is done by pumping brine from underground reservoirs and then evaporating the water to leave behind the lithium. This method is relatively inexpensive and can be done in a variety of locations. However, it can also be environmentally harmful, as it can require large amounts of water and can pollute the surrounding area.

Spodumene mining is a newer method of extracting lithium. It involves mining spodumene, a mineral that contains lithium, and then processing it to extract the lithium. This method is more expensive than lithium brine extraction, but it is less environmentally harmful. Spodumene mining is also more flexible, as it can be done in a wider variety of locations.

Ultimately, the best method of extracting lithium depends on a number of factors, including the cost, the environmental impact, and the availability of resources.

Summarizing the advantages and disadvantages of lithium brine extraction and spodumene mining:

Lithium brine extraction Inexpensive, can be done in a variety of locations
Environmentally harmful, requires large amounts of water

Spodumene mining Less environmentally harmful, can be done in a wider variety of locations More expensive, less flexible

It is important to note that the environmental impact of lithium extraction is a complex issue. There are a number of factors that can affect the environmental impact, including the method of extraction, the location of the extraction, and the management of the waste products.

Overall, both lithium brine extraction and spodumene mining are reliable methods of extracting lithium. The best method for a particular project will depend on a number of factors.

Is lithium brine extraction in the Argentinian Salars subject to weather conditions for example heavy rain?

Yes, lithium brine extraction in the Argentine salars is subject to weather conditions, such as heavy rain.

The salars are salt flats that are located in arid regions. They are formed when water evaporates, leaving behind salt and other minerals. Lithium is one of the minerals that is found in the salars.

Lithium brine extraction is done by pumping brine from the salars and then evaporating the water to leave behind the lithium. The evaporation process is done in open air ponds.

Heavy rain can disrupt the evaporation process by diluting the brine and making it more difficult to extract the lithium. Rain can also cause flooding, which can damage the infrastructure used for lithium extraction.

In addition to heavy rain, other weather conditions that can affect lithium brine extraction in the Argentine salars include:

High winds: High winds can blow the brine away from the evaporation ponds, making it difficult to extract the lithium.

Low temperatures: Low temperatures can slow down the evaporation process, making it take longer to extract the lithium.

Salinity: The salinity of the brine can affect the efficiency of the evaporation process.

The operators of lithium brine extraction plants in the Argentine salars take steps to mitigate the effects of weather conditions. These steps include:

Building berms: Berms are walls that are built around the evaporation ponds to prevent the brine from being blown away by the wind.

Using covers: Covers are used to protect the evaporation ponds from rain and wind.

Adding chemicals: Chemicals can be added to the brine to increase its salinity, which can help to speed up the evaporation process.

Despite the challenges posed by weather conditions, lithium brine extraction is a viable method of extracting lithium from the Argentine salars. The operators of lithium brine extraction plants in the Argentine salars are constantly working to improve their operations and to mitigate the effects of weather conditions.

Is lithium brine extraction in the Argentian Salars subject to weather conditions for example heavy rain or high humidity?

Yes, lithium brine extraction in the Argentine salars is subject to weather conditions, such as heavy rain and high humidity.

Heavy rain can disrupt the evaporation process by diluting the brine and making it more difficult to extract the lithium. Rain can also cause flooding, which can damage the infrastructure used for lithium extraction.

High humidity can also affect the evaporation process by making it more difficult for the water to evaporate. This can also make it more difficult to operate the machinery used for lithium extraction.

In addition to heavy rain and high humidity, other weather conditions that can affect lithium brine extraction in the Argentine salars include:

High winds: High winds can blow the brine away from the evaporation ponds, making it difficult to extract the lithium.

Low temperatures: Low temperatures can slow down the evaporation process, making it take longer to extract the lithium.

Salinity: The salinity of the brine can affect the efficiency of the evaporation process.
The operators of lithium brine extraction plants in the Argentine salars take steps to mitigate the effects of weather conditions. These steps include:

Building berms: Berms are walls that are built around the evaporation ponds to prevent the brine from being blown away by the wind.

Using covers: Covers are used to protect the evaporation ponds from rain and wind.
Adding chemicals: Chemicals can be added to the brine to increase its salinity, which can help to speed up the evaporation process.

Despite the challenges posed by weather conditions, lithium brine extraction is a viable method of extracting lithium from the Argentine salars. The operators of lithium brine extraction plants in the Argentine salars are constantly working to improve their operations and to mitigate the effects of weather conditions.

 

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The information on this site is for information purposes only. Alternative-Energy.com.au is neither responsible nor liable for the accuracy of this data.

Comments on this forum should never be taken as investment advice.

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  #2  
Old 08-25-2023, 07:14 AM
Sparty Sparty is offline
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Default The Salars

The Argentinian Salars are a group of salt flats located in the Andes Mountains of Argentina/Chile. They are home to some of the world's largest lithium reserves.

The most important Salars in Argentina for lithium extraction are:

Salar de Atacama: This is the largest salt flat in Argentina and the second-largest in the world. It is located in the Atacama Desert, which is one of the driest deserts in the world.

Salar de Olaroz: This is located in the Jujuy Province of Argentina. It is a smaller salt flat than the Salar de Atacama, but it has higher lithium concentrations.

Salar del Hombre Muerto: This is located in the Catamarca Province of Argentina. It is the third-largest salt flat in Argentina and has high lithium concentrations.

Salar de Rincon: This is located in the Salta Province of Argentina. It is a smaller salt flat than the other Salars mentioned, but it has high lithium concentrations.

Here are some additional information about the challenges of lithium brine extraction in the Argentine salars:

Water scarcity: The salars are located in arid regions, so there is a limited supply of water available for lithium extraction. This can make it difficult to operate the evaporation ponds and to maintain the salinity of the brine.

Environmental impact: Lithium brine extraction can have a negative impact on the environment. The evaporation ponds can dry up wetlands and salt flats, and the chemicals used in the extraction process can pollute the water supply.

Social impact: Lithium brine extraction can have a negative impact on the local communities. The construction of evaporation ponds can displace people from their homes, and the pollution from the extraction process can damage the health of the people living in the area.

Despite these challenges, lithium brine extraction is a major source of lithium in the world. The operators of lithium brine extraction plants in the Argentine salars are working to mitigate the environmental and social impacts of their operations, and they are developing new technologies to make lithium extraction more efficient and sustainable.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puna_de_Atacama

[IMG]By Ben Stubbs - https://www.flickr.com/photos/969355...n/photostream/, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/inde...=26477571/IMG]

 

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  #3  
Old 04-01-2024, 04:43 AM
Sparty Sparty is offline
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Default

All of Australia’s current Li resources and production are from lithium minerals,
chiefly spodumene, though other Li-bearing minerals such as lepidolite are also present.


These mineral deposits typically have average grades of 1 to 3% Li2O and are commonly associated with tin, and especially, tantalum (Ta) mineralisation. Nearly all of Australia’s resources are associated with granite pegmatites of Archean age, found within the Pilbara and Yilgarn cratons of Western Australia. https://www.ga.gov.au/scientific-top...eviews/lithium

N.B. Gemini: Pegmatites are ?
Pegmatites are a special type of igneous rock known for their giant crystals. Imagine granite, but instead of the usual medium-sized grains, pegmatites contain interlocking crystals that can be over a centimeter (think about the width of your pinky finger) in size, and sometimes even exceeding a meter (over 3 feet!) [Wikipedia, Pegmatite].

Here's a breakdown of pegmatites:

Giant crystals: This is their defining feature. The term "pegmatite" itself is based on this texture, not the mineral makeup [Geology.com, Pegmatite: Igneous Rock].

Composition: While most pegmatites resemble granite in composition, rich in quartz, feldspar, and mica, there can be variations. Pegmatites can also be found with a composition similar to other igneous rocks like gabbro or syenite [Wikipedia, Pegmatite].

Formation: Pegmatites form during the final stages of magma crystallization. As the magma cools and crystallizes, some rare elements get concentrated in the remaining liquid. This leftover liquid, enriched with these uncommon elements, can form the giant crystals we see in pegmatites [Geology.com, Pegmatite: Igneous Rock].

Valuable minerals: Due to the presence of these rare elements, pegmatites can be a source of valuable minerals not typically found in abundance elsewhere. Some examples include spodumene (a lithium ore) and beryl (an ore of beryllium) [Geology.com, Pegmatite: Igneous Rock].

 

Disclaimer: The author of this post, may or may not be a shareholder of any of the companies mentioned in this column. No company mentioned has sponsored or paid for this content.
The information on this site is for information purposes only. Alternative-Energy.com.au is neither responsible nor liable for the accuracy of this data.

Comments on this forum should never be taken as investment advice.

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  #4  
Old 06-19-2024, 07:28 AM
Sparty Sparty is offline
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Default Could global warming adversely effect lithium brine extraction?

Gemini? Q. Could global warming adversely effect lithium brine extraction?

A. Yes, global warming has the potential to adversely affect lithium brine extraction in several ways:

Increased Water Scarcity: A key concern is water scarcity. As temperatures rise and precipitation patterns change, some regions with lithium brine deposits may experience droughts, reducing the available water for pumping brine. This could limit production or force operations to find alternative water sources, potentially leading to higher costs or environmental impacts.

Evaporation Fluctuations: While warmer temperatures can accelerate the natural evaporation process used to extract lithium, it can be a double-edged sword. Excessive evaporation can concentrate brine faster, but it also increases overall water use. If more brine needs to be pumped to maintain production levels, it can exacerbate water scarcity issues.

Extreme Weather Events: More frequent and intense storms, floods, and heatwaves can disrupt lithium brine extraction. Floods can damage infrastructure and contaminate freshwater sources, while heatwaves can put stress on workers and equipment.

Brine Chemistry Changes: Rising temperatures may alter the composition of brine deposits, making it more difficult or expensive to extract lithium.

Additionally, global warming can indirectly affect lithium brine extraction by:

Heightened Environmental Scrutiny: As climate change concerns grow, regulations on lithium brine extraction may become stricter, potentially slowing down new projects or increasing operational costs.

Social Pressures: Communities near brine extraction sites may become more vocal about environmental impacts, putting pressure on mining companies to adopt sustainable practices.

Overall, global warming presents a complex challenge for the lithium brine extraction industry. While some aspects might seem beneficial, the overall impact is likely negative. The industry will need to adapt and innovate to mitigate these risks and ensure sustainable lithium production for the clean energy transition.

In depth analysis: https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley....9/2021EF002555

 

Disclaimer: The author of this post, may or may not be a shareholder of any of the companies mentioned in this column. No company mentioned has sponsored or paid for this content.
The information on this site is for information purposes only. Alternative-Energy.com.au is neither responsible nor liable for the accuracy of this data.

Comments on this forum should never be taken as investment advice.

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